Corticosteroid releasing factor

The growth of children and adolescents receiving orally inhaled corticosteroids, including QVAR, should be monitored routinely (., via stadiometry). If a child or adolescent on any corticosteroid appears to have growth suppression, the possibility that he/she is particularly sensitive to this effect should be considered. The potential growth effects of prolonged treatment should be weighed against clinical benefits obtained and the risks associated with alternative therapies. To minimize the systemic effects of orally inhaled corticosteroids, including QVAR, each patient should be titrated to his/her lowest effective dose [see Dosage and Administration ( )] .

Persons who are using drugs that suppress the immune system (., corticosteroids) are more susceptible to infections than healthy individuals. Chickenpox and measles , for example, can have a more serious or even fatal course in susceptible children or adults using corticosteroids. In children or adults who have not had these diseases or been properly immunized, particular care should be taken to avoid exposure. How the dose, route, and duration of corticosteroid administration affect the risk of developing a disseminated infection is not known. The contribution of the underlying disease and/or prior corticosteroid treatment to the risk is also not known. If a patient is exposed to chickenpox, prophylaxis with varicella zoster immune globulin (VZIG) may be indicated. If a patient is exposed to measles, prophylaxis with pooled intramuscular immunoglobulin ( IG ) may be indicated (see the respective package inserts for complete VZIG and IG prescribing information). If chickenpox or measles develops, treatment with antiviral agents may be considered.

The PROPEL sinus implants are intended for use after sinus surgery to maintain patency and to locally deliver steroid to the sinus mucosa: PROPEL for use in the ethmoid sinus, PROPEL Mini for use in the ethmoid sinus and frontal sinus opening, and PROPEL Contour for use in the frontal and maxillary sinus ostia. The implants are intended for use in patients ≥18 years of age. Contraindications include patients with intolerance to mometasone furoate (MF) or a hypersensitivity to bioabsorbable polymers. Safety and effectiveness of the implants in pregnant or nursing females have not been studied. Risks may include, but are not limited to, pain/pressure, displacement of implant, possible side effects of intranasal MF, sinusitis, epistaxis, and infection. For complete prescribing information see IFU at . Rx only.

Addiction to cortisone was the subject of the 1956 motion picture, Bigger Than Life , produced by and starring James Mason . Though it was a box-office flop upon its initial release, [15] many modern critics hail it as a masterpiece and brilliant indictment of contemporary attitudes towards mental illness and addiction. [16] In 1963, Jean-Luc Godard named it one of the ten best American sound films ever made. [17] John F. Kennedy needed to regularly use corticosteroids such as cortisone as a treatment for Addison's Disease . [18]

Corticosteroid releasing factor

corticosteroid releasing factor

Addiction to cortisone was the subject of the 1956 motion picture, Bigger Than Life , produced by and starring James Mason . Though it was a box-office flop upon its initial release, [15] many modern critics hail it as a masterpiece and brilliant indictment of contemporary attitudes towards mental illness and addiction. [16] In 1963, Jean-Luc Godard named it one of the ten best American sound films ever made. [17] John F. Kennedy needed to regularly use corticosteroids such as cortisone as a treatment for Addison's Disease . [18]

Media:

corticosteroid releasing factorcorticosteroid releasing factorcorticosteroid releasing factorcorticosteroid releasing factorcorticosteroid releasing factor